08 February 2014

Spread Hexagons


Project No. 2 : 


Spread Hexagons tessellation designed by Eric Gjerde. This design is the first origami tessellation Eric Gjerde discovered on his own. The pattern reminds me of honey comb. Front view of this design is overlapping hexagons and back view is similar to a honey comb with repeating hexagons.

I first practiced 120 degree pleat intersection which is the basic fold throughout this tessellation. I made a single hexagon.

Front view of resulting hexagon:


Back view of the same:



I then started with 8.5 inch square sheet, made a hexagon out of this square sheet. The resulting hexagon had a side of 4.2 inch which was my starting point. One could start on a square sheet as well, without making hexagon. This step can be skipped.

First identify the center hexagon and make a 120 degree pleat intersection on all six vertices.

I took quite sometime to figure out the folds for the subsequent layers. The confusing part was to start the second layer around the central hexagon. One could mark the crease pattern given in the book. I started without it. But it's not really difficult to complete without marking crease pattern and just by following instructions given in the book.

To complete four layers, I took almost two days (may be 4 hours).

With hexagon of side 4.2 inch, I could make 4 layers (including the center hexagon which I count as first layer). For more layers, we need a bigger sheet.




The instructions in the book are very clear. I read and re-read to clearly understand.

Once I figured out the trick, it was not so difficult to complete. Thoroughly enjoyed making this tessellation. This photo is of my first attempt.

Online instructions by Eric Gjerde here:

http://www.origamitessellations.com/docs/spread-hexagon-tessellation.pdf

I used color printer paper.

Difficulty : Intermediate.

Time required : Once the folds are clear I would say this model can be easily finished within one hour for four layers.

Number of Sheets : One

Reference : Origami Tessellations by Eric Gjerde







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